Klevfos Cellulose & Paper Mill 1888-1976

The factory is a piece of industrial history from the time when wood processing was our largest export industry.

  • Klevfos Cellulose & Paper Mill, one of Norway’s smallest paper mills–now an industrial museum.
    Klevfos Cellulose & Paper Mill, one of Norway’s smallest paper mills–now an industrial museum. Bård Løken

Klevfos Cellulose & Paper Mill was founded at Ådalsbruk, Løten municipality, approx. 15 km east of Hamar, in 1888.

  • Klevfos Cellulose & Paper Mill from the south, before it was closed down.
    Klevfos Cellulose & Paper Mill from the south, before it was closed down.

Most of the mill burned to the ground in 1909 but was completely rebuilt by 1911. There were a number of improvements made to the factory up until 1920, and the operation was profitable. 

With up to 100 employees and an annual production that clearly makes Klevfos the smallest of the country's cellulose and paper mills, Klevfos staggers through the harsh 30ties, and produces steadily during the boom times after World War II.

Klevfos manages to keep going until 1976. Then it is all over–and pink slips are handed out.

The Klevfos Industrial Museum opened in June of 1986

Today, the old industrial environment by Svartelva (The Black River) in Løten plays an important role in documenting the cellulose and paper production. 

Klevfos is also one of the 13 plants prioritised by the Directorate for Cultural Heritage in its efforts to preserve industrial heritage sites. The factory stands as it did in 1976, the tours take you through the various departments, and you can follow the process from timber to finished paper.

  • The machines in the workshop were also powered by hydropower.
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    The machines in the workshop were also powered by hydropower.
  • The old smithy at Klevfos.
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    The old smithy at Klevfos.
  • The anvil was one of the blacksmith’s most important tools.
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    The anvil was one of the blacksmith’s most important tools.
  • The furnace had glowing coals, where he heated the iron so that he could shape it.
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    The furnace had glowing coals, where he heated the iron so that he could shape it.
  • The old workshop at Klevfos.
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    The old workshop at Klevfos.
  • From the machine shop.
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    From the machine shop.

The old smithy is also located on the factory site. There, you can see the furnace where the blacksmith heated the iron he was going to forge, and the anvil, where he shaped it. The old workshop is located next to the smithy, where the machine shop was on the first floor and a carpentry shop was upstairs.

  • The living room in an apartment from the 30ties, where you can still see how the Klevfos worker and his family lived.
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    The living room in an apartment from the 30ties, where you can still see how the Klevfos worker and his family lived.

Other things to see at the Klevfos Industrial Museum

The Klevfos Residence has furnished apartments that show how the Klevfos worker and his family lived. You can also make your own paper by hand.

The museum has a large open area with dam facilities and channels. There are benches, picnic tables and playground equipment for the children. In the nearby area, there are good options for hiking.

  • Testing the water wheels in the outdoor area.
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    Testing the water wheels in the outdoor area.

The Play "Arbesdaer" (“Working Days”)

The play "Arbesdaer" by Tor Karseth has become an important trademark for the museum and is played during the summer. For over 30 years, the audience has experienced a 1.5 hour show about work and leisure at Klevfos.

  • Paper hens in the play “Working Days”.
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    Paper hens in the play “Working Days”.